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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
the people, the emergency officials that he has been in touch with regarding superstorm sandy and that he would, in fact, take good care to make sure that people are responding to that natural disaster. also, very much sounding like this is a time where they are trying to, the candidates, put partisan politics aside. here's what he said just moments ago. >> because when disasters strike, we see america at its best. all the petty differences that consume us in normal times all seem to melt away. there are no democrats or republicans during a storm. there are just fellow americans. >> want to bring in briana keiller, with the president in green bay, wisconsin. briana, i thought that was a really interesting passage there, part of this speech. there are no democrats, republicans during a storm. we're all just americans. well, some people say, you know what, the storm is over, and we are back to politics as usual. how is he balancing these two messages? >> reporter: well, this was really the segue. part of the way that he is balancing is by staying in touch, obviously, with officials in affec
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. recovery is slow going for millions of people affected by sandy and the superstorm is not done yet. storm remnants triggered flood watch warnings from northern new england and mid-atlantic states. winter storm warnings for central appalachians and flooding advisories across the lower great lakes. 74 people have been killed by the mega storm at one point. 60 million people were without power. it's fallen to 40 million people. and 6 million homes and businesses. and back up batteries and generators are failing knocking out one in five cell phone towers. here's a timeline video of how some 650,000 new yorkers lost power. the storm rolled in. you see the freedom tower on the right. night falls. the substation explodes. lower manhattan is plunged into darkness. mayor bloomberg said could it be days before power is restored. >> reporter: good morning. i'm standing in front of the entrance to new york's fdr drive. this is one of the areas that remains flooded after the storm. down at the jersey shore the devastation is even worse. president obama visited
good afternoon, everyone. i'm anderson cooper this is cnn special coverage of superstorm sandy, the devastation, the rescues, the early efforts to recover and most importantly to rebuild. i'm live in new york city from a balcony of the time warner center. just over my should, the chanced crane still dangling over 57th street, the entire area still blocked off. the storm claimed least 50 lives in the u.s. and one in canada. a woman who was hit by storm-tossed debris, damage is expected to run into tens of billions of dollars. and today, a new challenge, looters breaking into businesses. >> people coming out with all kinds of stuff, everything. whatever you can think of, from juice and sodas, waters, cigarettes, tvs, anything you can think of, they were getting it. >> 9,000 people spent the night in red cross shelters spread across 13 states. national guard troops arrived overnight and are rescuing families trapped by floodwaters in hoboken, new jersey. we learned today that the navy is sending three amphibious landing ships to the coast of new york and new jersey in case they're
here. ♪ >>> welcome back to our continuing coverage of superstorm sandy. aaron herman walked around his neighborhood, capturing some of the destruction he saw following the superstorm. let's watch. >> devastation in white plains, where literally trees are ripped from its roots. >> amazing stuff. first, irene, now sandy. for two consecutive years, costly deadly hurricanes hit the northeast. we're hear a lot of people say if irene was a wake-up call, sandy is a bucket of water that should snap us all to attention. let's listen to andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that is not a political statement, that is not a factual statement. anyone who says there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. and i would like to say that this is probably the last occurrence we will have. i don't believe that. >> cuomo went on to say new york now seems to get a 100 year flood every two years. joining me now is ben strauss, the chief operating officer and director of the program on sea level rise at climate
is still quite the nightmare. laguardia hit hard by superstorm sandy opened a few hours ago but with limited service. also limited service at some of the other new york airports. this morning a few subway lines are back up and run ining. trains will stay away from lower manhattan where the power is still out. buses, as you might expect, are packed with many people waiting hours in line to get on board. the good news? all public transportation is free today and tomorrow. oh, but then there's the traffic gridlock. treats are packed and mayor michael bloomberg says all cars coming into manhattan must have at least three people inside. one lawmaker is balking at the idea of spending your tax dollars there. steve king is a republican congressman from landlocked iowa, a fiscal conservative who often rails against spending. in fact, he gained prominence for opposing federal aid for victims of hurricane katrina. he says that can teach us lessons now. >> i want to get them resources to lift them out of this water and the sand and the ashes and the death that's over there in the east
of superstorm sandy. i am in toms river, new jersey, on the hard-hit new jersey coastline. we're going to take you now to manhattan, still struggling to recover. sinlt ya mcfadden is at one of new york city's major hospitals where evacuations of the sick are currently under way. cynthia? >> good evening, terry. that's right. well, new york began to wobble back to her feet today. the new york stock exchange opened and some buses are running, but i am standing in front of the third major hospital to shut down since the storm. this is the legendary bellevue. yesterday, when they began the evacuation, there were 725 patients inside. tonight, there are still about 200 patients inside, along with 200 members of the national guard, who are helping carry them down, sometimes as many as 18 stories. you know, we began the day here but we spent much of it in yet another community where the devastation is still to be fully unpacked. a community just outside of new york, the rockaways. this morning, the word went out. backup generators operating since monday night had failed. national guard troops called i
medication, astrazeneca may be able to help. >>> as superstorm sandy battering the east coast, we also have snow. >> you're a well-known storm chaser, in elkin, west virginia, in the middle of hurricanes, tornadoes, what else. what do you make from this experience? >> this is the most unusual storm i've ever chased. we'll probably never see anything like it again in our lifetime. if we do, it must have something to do with the climate change because we haven't seen anything like this in recorded history. basically when a worm core tropical cyclone, a strong hurricane, emerges with midlat tut cyclone creating the monster, a nor'easter on steroids. you inject it with tropical moisture and it goes nuts. >> in terms of the scale and impact, is it the biggest storm the northeast has ever seen? >> i think it might be, especially in term of geographicical size and scope of those impacts. one thing, when a hurricane does miss with jeff trough is it will expand in size. so, warm car tropical cyclone it's more impact. impacted with the polar stream jet stream that's when it expands and tropical force
to our "starting point" this morning, it's day three of that fallout from superstorm sandy. millions of people without power in their homes. and as john mentioned, they're literally trying to pick up the pieces that remain from their homes, the pieces of their lives. yesterday the president and governor chris christie of new jersey toured the destruction on the jersey shore right near atlantic city. the mayor of atlantic city joins us this morning. let's talk specifically, sir, and thanks for joining us this morning, about the damage that's happened to atlantic city. you have the iconic boardwalk, you have the casinos, you have lots of hotels. fill me in on how atlantic city is faring. >> well, let me tell you that the boardwalk did suffer some major damage, but property can be replaced. the good news is in atlantic city and in atlantic county, that there was only one fatality. and when i say "only," i don't mean to minimize that fatality, one is too many, but given the catastrophic nature of this storm, i think we were blessed and spared that on the human side in terms of loss, ther
a singular focus on what they call doing his job focusing on the superstorm sandy with his officials here in a face-to-face way. and now he can go on the campaign trail. and they say he will continue these ongoing updates on the road. you know, presidents always say they take the job with them, they can do it anywhere. but symbolically very important for a president to be at the white house during a crisis. and that's why they rushed him back here during sandy. one of the messages, wolf, that he's been conveying to these people he meets at the shelter is that the u.s. government, his administration, will be with them for the long haul. they're not just here to visit but that they will do what it takes for the long haul. that's the message he keeps conveying. and i should say also praising his fema director who has also gotten some praise from governor christie as well, wolf. >> governor christie has been very fusive in his phrase. as they head toward the microphones let's take a quick, quick break. on the other side we'll hear from the president. [ woman ] it's 32 minutes to go time, and
and there is no power south of 34th street. the financial district the stock exchange did reopen today. superstorm sandy has crippled that system. there is catastrophic damage to underground tracks and equipment. the mta says it is too early to tell whether full service will return and be fixed. millions of commuters use the system every day. commuters relied on buses, cars and cabs if you were lucky enough to find them. there was gridlock as bad as we have ever seen. look at a live shot of columbus circle south of central park on the west side. central park still remained closed. it has been like this all day. one of the reasons is that crane is still dangling over 57th street and that is creating the massive traffic jam around the circle. jason joins me from the queensboro bridge. i talked to you earlier today and most people have given up trying to get a vehicle they were walking. >> oh, yeah, it has been a frustrating day for thousands of commuters making their way across the bridge. you can look through the traffic people still making their way at this hour even at 8:00. it is the only way for a lo
to focus his attention to the federal government's response to superstorm sandy. leaving the campaign trail to surrogates. but today, he's back for the final sprint. the action picks up again with both candidates on the trail. president obama visits wisconsin, nevada and colorado for the first campaign since sandy hit. >> we can't go on the road we're on. we can't change course in america if we keep on attacking each other. we've got to come together and get america on track again. >> reporter: the race is still a dead-heat. the daily abc news/"washington post" tracking poll show the candidates tied among likely voters at 49%. the same poll found president obama's response to the superstorm positively. 78% say mr. obama's handling the situation excellent or good. the president toured storm-ravaged new jersey with republican governor chris christie. >> hang in there. >> reporter: the governor, usually one of the president's harshest critics had nothing but find words for him. >> he's worked closely with me. and i can't thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for ou
.m. in the east. we begin with the latest on the aftermath of the superstorm hurricane ire hurricane sandy. most buses are up and running again and they are free of charge. but most of lower manhattan still has no power and temperatures are dipping into the 30s and 40s. >> and there are no heartbreaking picture as long the jersey shore barrier islands. houses picked up, some just buried in the sand and governor chris christie who toured the destruction with president obama said some parts of the shore may never look the same again. >> the death toll reached 124 people with 56 in the united states. at least 28 in new york. and close to 5 million customers are still waiting for the power to come back on. >> cnn has the entire disaster zone covered this morning. our correspondents spanned out across lower manhattan and all up and down the jersey shore. >> first, the economic capital of our country is slowly getting back to normal this morning even while facing extreme damage. power outages and people having to walk for hours just to get to work. meantime, another hospital lost generator power in lo
of momentum. superstorm sandy hit and you feel that momentum gone and what you are seeing is barack obama is commander in chief. talking to the red cross. working with the army corps of engineers. so the president's handled all this this in a very astute way. it's lyndon johnson did a good job of hurricane betsy in 1975 and george w. bush was awful during hurricane katrina because he seemed cold, callous and indifferent. >> what do you make of the closeness of all of this to the election, as well? the time line, the time line. >> it's a bizarre event. in 1992, with hurricane andrew with george herbert walker bush beat up by democrats for not responding properly to that florida hurricane but that took place in august so people -- there's always some fallout. right now this is so close to the election there's not a downside for president obama. the complaints coming from the greater new york area will be in about two or three weeks with problems of mold or fema didn't do something correctly or the army corps arguing. but the president doesn't have to deal with that because they're in emerge
or what is causing it-- rages on without signs of abating. superstorm sandy battered the coastline. and a record 14-foot storm surge brought new york city to a standstill, leaving the city with potentially staggering repair costs. all this came just months after the summer heat wave caused harsh droughts throughout the midwest, and wildfires that engulfed entire swaths of colorado, according to the national oceanic and atmospheric administration the last year from june of 2011 to july of 2012 was the nation's warmest year since recordkeeping began in 1895. and it's just over a year ago that hurricane irene caused record flooding in the northeast. but with sandy came new records and according to new york governor andrew cuomo, more pressure for governments to act. >> i joke that every two years we have a 100 year flood. the frequency is way up. it is not prudent, to sit here, i believe, at this point and say, well it's not going to happen again. once you have that recognition, then what are you doing about it. and what design changes, what construction changes are you making to deal
by superstorm sandy when it comes to power outages. deb feyerick was talking about the new york city area. the darker the color the higher number of people without power. new york you move down to the state of new jersey, incredibly hard hit along the shoreline. we know new york and new jersey likely to go democratic. let's walk over to the state of pennsylvania and look at this, you see this down here, let me help you understand this chart a little bit. i'm going to pop it out and this explains the darker the color the higher the number of people without power so as we come back to the state of pennsylvania i want to show you something. if you look it's obvious to the naked eye in this area here is where you see more people without power, scranton a lentown, reading, down here in philadelphia and the suburbs, about 100,000, maybe a little more than that out of power in philadelphia and month dpgomery bucks county alone. let's look at how they voted in the last election. if the problems persist right there that tells you more of a problem for the president and if there's no power at polli
and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i did today, in fact, i was just on the phone before i came in here, was talk to fema about trying to get an office and a staff person in various parts of the district that i viewed today, and they're working on i
cuomo making clear that america will see more superstorms like sandy. michael bloomberg saying the same thing. >> i think it has got ten worse. we are in big trouble and in congress whether or not there is global warming. >> the people the majority of americans believe we have climate problems. >> could it just be a global weather thing that may have happened 500 years ago you get pockets of this and we don't have the records to back that up? >> could it be that? >> i will answer the way that mayor block bergomberg answeredy he did today. yeah, what if you were wrong. we weren't prepared. how many times do we have to get punched in the face before we realize that somebody some pupching us in the face. >> chad, is this global warming is there any other explanation? >> it is the prime suspect. i don't have another one. the rain drops the moisture can get on the drops and get bigger, but i think probably sandy would have existed without global warming. the one degree warmer probably made the strong 10% stronger. if you double twind speed from 0 to 40 miles per hour. you have raised the for
of hurricane sandy. the northeast absolutely devastated by the superstorm. we are learning because of the response to sandy and because of concerns to climate change, the mayor of new york city, mayor michael bloomberg is endorsing president obama. wolf blitzer, i want to go to you and ask. i interviewed the mayor a month or two ago and asked if he'd open up an endorsement. does this surprise you? >> he was on the sidelines four years ago. it is a surprise coming this late but he wrote this long article just now and i just been reading it, brooke and made the case given what happened in new york and new jersey and connecticut over the past few days, the results of this superstorm, the potential as he believes that global warming could have a potential impact, he thinks the issue is so important that there's a significant difference between president obama and mitt romney on this issue. he has now formally gone forward and explained why he thinks president obama should be re-elected. he doesn't like what he says is the flip flopping coming from mitt romney in the past. he writes he
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)